Ancient Greek & Roman Artifacts & Art : Sculptures & Statues

TheArtifact Art & Artifact Catalog Archive:   02/04:  PLEASE NOTE: To better serve you we have a new and updated catalog!  For the following and many new products, please visit our main page at www.museumstorecompany.com or click on the link below to see the current product information at our new catalogue!

Thank you so much again and of course always let us know if there is anything else we can do for you.      Thank you again, Jon Fetzer, Curator, TheArtifact!   Email: infoarchive1@museumstorecompany.com

 

Greek Sphinx - Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. 540-530 B.C. : This sphinx was a part of a Attic grave monument of the middle archaic period that reflected the opulence of the wealthy class of that time. The sphinx was placced atop a tall shaft, decorated with high relief sculpture and crowned by a cavetto capital. The shaft was supported by a rectangular base. All together the monument stands over 13 feet high. The sphinx is shown crouching instead of seated. The greek sphinx had a woman’s head, lion’s body, serpent’s tail and eagle’s wind. In Greek myth the sphinx was sent by Hera to punish Thebes for displeasing the Goddess. The sphinx settled on Mount Phicium, near the city and asked everyone who passed by to answer a riddle she had learned from the three muses: “What being, with only one voice, has sometimes two feet, sometimes three, sometimes four and is weakest when it has the most?” Anyone unable to render the correct answer was immediately slain. One day Oedipus chanced along that road and guessed the answer: “Man, because he crawls on all four as an infant, stands firmly on his two feet in his youth and leans on a staff in his old age.” Completely shattered by her defeat, the sphinx threw herself from the mountain and Oedipus was acclaimed king.

LOT 389 : 10"H

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 389

Greek Sphinx - Metro

Parthenon Horse - Parthenon Temple, Athens. 465 B.C. : Horses were an integral part of life in ancient Greece. They played an active role in warfare, transportation and in the games such as the Panathenaic Games in Athens with its huge contingent of cavalry riders. Athenian enthusiasm for the horse was clearly expressed in the many civic buildings and temples that were adorned with paintings and sculptures of riders and battle scenes showing cavalry such as in the Parthenon friezes where this wonderful horse head originates. Two deities, Poseidon and Athena, together served as protectors of horses and patrons of horsemanship and equestrian activities. Athena, Patron Goddess of Athens, was credited with the invention of the bridle and the use of chariots. The horse was a symbol of prestige, wealth and status. Social rank has often been defined by the ability to own and maintain a horse. The Aristocratic families that ruled Athens during the 6th century B.C. often took pride in their nobility by starting or ending their name with the word hippos (horse). The aristocracy bred and raced horses from very early times and it seems that chariot racing was the preferred form of competition and maybe the foundation of the Olympic Games

LOT 390 : 8"H, Statue on marble base

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 390

Parthenon Horse - Pa

Head of Hygeia - National Archaeological Museum, Athens. 360 B.C. : She was the daughter of Asclepios, the God of medicine. She was worshipped as the Goddess of Health. Her worship probably started in the 4th century at Epidauros in association with the great temple to Asclepios that was bringing thousands of infirm people to that city for medical assistance. The beautiful marble head from which this reproduction was made has a divine sweetness and is thought to have been the work of Skopas, one of the three greatest sculptors of the 4th century B.C. It probably belonged to a statue which stood in the temple of Athena Alea at Tegea in the Peleponnese

LOT 392 : 8"H, Statue on marble base

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 392

Head of Hygeia - Nat

Aphrodite of Melos - Louvre Museum, Paris, 200BC : Her graceful body symbolizes and ideal of beauty that many long for but none attain. The French named here the Venus of Milo. In 1820, a peasant named Yorgos found her broken body in an underground cavern on the Aegean island of Melos. Later she was taken out of Greece under unclear circumstances to Paris, where she was to be admired by the millions of visitors to that country’s great museum, the Louvre! Aphrodite was the Goddess of Love, identified in Rome with Venus. Although Homer describes Aphrodite as the daughter of Zeus and Dion, the more popular view was that she was conceived in the foam of the ocean from the seed of Uranus. Dropped there when he was castrated, her name meaning “foam-born”. Aphrodite was married to Hephaestus, but she loved Ares and she was known for her many love affairs, notably with Adonis and Anchises.

LOT 734 : 12.5"H on Marble Base

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 734

Aphrodite of Melos -

Athena - National Museum, Athens, 340BC : Athena was the Greek Goddess of wisdom and women’s crafts. She was also a defender against evil and a warrior Goddess par excellence. She was the daughter of Zeus and Metis. When Metis became pregnant, Gaia and Uranus told Zeus that after giving birth to a daughter, she would then have a son by Zeus who would later dethrone him. On Gaia’s advice, Zeus swallowed Metis. When the time came for the child to be born, Zeus was afflicted with a dreadful headache and sought the help of Hephaestus who split his skull with a bronze axe to relieve the pain. A girl in full armor sprang forth from his head: It was Athena, Athena’s attributes were the spear, the helmet, and the Aegis (a goat-skin shield). She attached the Gorgon’s head which Perseus had given her to her shield, and this turned to stone every living thing that looked at it.

LOT 773 : 10.5"H on Marble Base

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 773

Athena - National Mu

Head of Zeus - National Museum, Athens, 450BC : This bust was taken from the magnificent full figure which was first called Poseidon, God of the Sea. That identification is now questioned. The balance of evidence tilts towards Zeus, the Chief of the Olympian Gods, and this is now accepted by the majority of archaeologist. An arm of the statue was first found in 1926 under the sea in the remains of an old shipwreck north of Athens. The rest of the figure was recovered two years later. Many art historians believe that the statue was that work of Kalamis. Zeus ruled over the sky and all atmospheric phenomena – winds, clouds, rain and even the destructive thunder and lightning came under his command. Being ruler of the sky, he was venerated in lofty places such as mountaintops. The oak was sacred to him as was the thunderbolt and eagle.

LOT 774 : 10"H on Marble Base

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 774

Head of Zeus - Natio

Bust of Apollo - National Museum, Athens, 520BC : Apollo was the son of the god Zeus and Leto, daughter of a Titan. He also bore the epithets "Delian" from Delos, the island of his birth, and "Pythian," from his killing of the Python, the fabled serpent that guarded a shrine on the slopes of Mount Parnassus. In Homeric legend Apollo was primarily a god of prophecy. His most important oracle was at Delphi, the site of his victory over the Python. He sometimes gave the gift of prophecy to mortals whom he loved, such as the Trojan princess Cassandra. He was also a master archer and a fleet-footed athlete, credited with having been the first victor in the Olympian Games.

LOT 776 : 9"H on Marble Base

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 776

Bust of Apollo - Nat

Hecate (Greek Triple Goddess) - Metropolitian Museum of Art, New York : Hecate originally derived from the Egyptian midwife Goddess Hekat. In Greece, Hecate was one of the many names for the original feminine trinity ruling Heaven, Earth and the Underworld. Greeks tend to emphasize her crone or underworld aspect. Hecate was called “Most lovely one”, a title of the moon. She was associated with the moon in all three of her aspects. Some said she was Hecate Selene, the Moon in Heaven; Artemis the Huntress on Earth and Persephone the Destroyer in the Underworld. Sometimes she was part of the Queen of Heaven Trinity; Hebe the Virgin, Hera the Mother and Hecate the Crone.

LOT 733 : 10.5"H

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 733

Hecate (Greek Triple

Pan Statue : A God of shepherds and flocks, he was depicted with a reed pipe, a shepherd's crook and being half-man half-goat, with horns, a goat's beard and goat legs. He personifies humanity's animal nature. He was a popular God, though never part of the official Olympian pantheon. Pan has much in common with Dionysos in that he is associated with wine, sex, and passion in general. A Homeric hymm says that he was the son of Hermes by a daughter of Dryops. Pan's mother was frightened by her monstrous offspring, so Hermes took him to Olympus. The Gods were delighted with the child, especially Dionysos, and he was given the name Pan because he made them all happy. (In Greek, Pan means "All").

LOT 394 : 10.5" H

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 394

Pan Statue

Greek Sphinx - Delphi Museum, Greece, 460BC : The Greek Sphinx had a woman’s head, lion’s body, serpent’s tail and eagle’s wings. Sent by Hera to punish Thebes for displeasing the Goddess, she settled on Mount Phicium, near the city and asked everyone who passed by to answer a riddle she had learned from the three Muses: “What being, with only one voice, has sometimes two fee, sometimes three, sometimes four, and is weakest when it has the most?” Anyone unable to render the correct answer was immediately slain. One day Oedipus chanced along that road and guessed the answer: “Man, because he crawls on all four as an infant, stands firmly on his two feet in his youth and leans on a staff in his old age.” Completely shattered by her defeat, the Sphinx threw herself from the mountain and Oedipus was acclaimed King. The people from the island of Naxos gave this sphinx to the city of Delphi as a gift to the oracle.

LOT 732 : 9"H on Marble Base

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 732

Greek Sphinx - Delph

Head of Hermes - National Museum, Athens, 325BC : This bust is part of a statue discovered beneath the waters of the Bay of Marathon in 1926. All its’ harmonious lines show that it was an advanced work of Praxiteles, one of the greatest sculptors of the 4th Century B.C. With the growth of the Olympian Pantheon, the story was that Zeus beget Hermes by the nymph Maia, daughter of Atlas, and as one of the Olympians, Hermes assumed the role of Patron of Travelers and Divine Messenger of the Gods. Travel, commerce, learning, agility, games of chance, all kinds of profit and all forms of mental activity were his forte. He is usually depicted carrying a Caduceus, the insignia of the medical profession. He is credited with the invention of the lyre which he gave to Apollo in exchange for the Caduceus. His symbols are Caduceus, Petasus (Winged Helmet) and Talaria (Winged Sandals).

LOT 735 : 10"H on Marble Base

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 735

Head of Hermes - Nat

Head of Pan - National Museum, Athens. 460 B.C. : A God of shepherds and flocks, he was depicted with a reed pipe, a shepherd's crook and being half-man half-goat, with horns, a goat's beard and goat legs. He personifies humanity's animal nature. He was a popular God, though never part of the official Olympian pantheon. Pan has much in common with Dionysos in that he is associated with wine, sex, and passion in general. A Homeric hymm says that he was the son of Hermes by a daughter of Dryops. Pan's mother was frightened by her monstrous offspring, so Hermes took him to Olympus. The Gods were delighted with the child, especially Dionysos, and he was given the name Pan because he made them all happy. (In Greek, Pan means "All").

LOT 393 : 9.5"H, Statue on marble base

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 393

Head of Pan - Nation

Aphrodite of Melos - Louvre Museum, Paris, 200BC : Her graceful body symbolizes an ideal of beauty that many long for but none attain. The French named her the Venus of Milo. In 1820 a peasant named Yorgos found her broken body in an underground cavern on the Aegean island of Melos. Later she was taken out of Greece under unclear circumstances to be taken to Paris where she was to be admired by the millions of visitors to that country's great museum-the Louvre! Aphrodite was the Goddess of Love, identified in Rome with Venus. Although Homer describes Aphrodite as the daughter of Zeus and Dion, the more popular view was that she was conceived in the foam of the ocean from the seed of Uranus. Dropped there when he was castrated, her name meaning "foam-born". Aphrodite was married to Hephaestus, but she loved Ares and she was known for her many love affairs, notably with Adonis and Anchises.

LOT 395 : 20" H, Statue on marble base

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 395

Aphrodite of Melos -

jonline1.jpg (3598 bytes)

TheArtifact Main Page & Artifact Categories
  About Us    |    Customer & Press Comments     |     Contact Us


Call Us:  Toll Free 888.965.0001

International: USA 303.355.3021

CrCdSmH.gif (2236 bytes)

Own a piece of history...Give a piece of history™

© Copyright 1997-2004, Arden Technologies, Inc.,
TheArtifact
, TheArtifacts, ArtifactArt, Artifact Art  artifact.biz, iCentre, iValue and Arden are all trademarks of Arden Technologies, Inc.

Additional note: the following 3rd Levels at artifact.biz are licensed quicklinks to TheArtifact sections:
prehistoric, fossil, ancientegypt, ancientegyptian, pyramids, egyptian pyramids, ancient egypt history, mummies, ancient egyption, egyptian, egyption, egypt, greek gods, greek mythology, ancient greece, relic hunter, interior, ancient india, chinese culture, chinese, ancient china, asian jewelry, japanese culture, ancient aztec, mayan culture, medieval times, gothic art, home, icons, renaissance, tapestries, medieval, middle ages, christian art, wedding gifts, religious, gods goddess, nativity scene, christian, religious jewelry, religious art, antique jewelry, antique, antiques, assyrian, and russian history.

Thank you for visiting us!
© Copyright 1997-2004, Arden Technologies, Inc
.