Ancient Egyptian Artifacts & Art : Large (Designer) Reliefs

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Coronation scene of Seti I, Painted - Temple of Abidos, Egypt. 19th. Dynasty 1317 B.C. : This relief shows King Seti I on his throne at his coronation carrying the crook and flail scepters symbols of kingship, wearing the Atef crown and supported on one side by Edjo, the cobra Goddess of Upper Egypt and by Nekhbet, the vulture Goddess of Lower Egypt in the missing part of the relief, both in the guise of elegant Queens. A capable ruler, excellent field commander and energetic builder, Seti I embarked on a series of military campaigns in an effort to secure the boundaries of Egypt, echoing the achievement of Kings of the XVIII dynasty before Akhenaten. The sculpted reliefs of this reign attained a degree of refinement rarely excelled, particularly in the colorful scenes of the Abydos temple and his royal tomb in the Valley of the Kings. The tomb, the deepest and longest in the valley, established an entirely new type of layout, an extended tunnel decorated with elaborate representations of the journey of the sun, incorporating the king, through the night sky and the mysteries of solar rebirth. Seti I was seceded by his son, the famous Ramses II The Great.

LOT 407 : 33"H x 29"W, Wall Hanging of Casting stone with fiberglass reinforcement

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 407

Coronation scene of

Coronation scene of Seti I - Temple of Abidos, Egypt. 19th. Dynasty 1317 B.C. : This relief shows King Seti I on his throne at his coronation carrying the crook and flail scepters symbols of kingship, wearing the Atef crown and supported on one side by Edjo, the cobra Goddess of Upper Egypt and by Nekhbet, the vulture Goddess of Lower Egypt in the missing part of the relief, both in the guise of elegant Queens. A capable ruler, excellent field commander and energetic builder, Seti I embarked on a series of military campaigns in an effort to secure the boundaries of Egypt, echoing the achievement of Kings of the XVIII dynasty before Akhenaten. The sculpted reliefs of this reign attained a degree of refinement rarely excelled, particularly in the colorful scenes of the Abydos temple and his royal tomb in the Valley of the Kings. The tomb, the deepest and longest in the valley, established an entirely new type of layout, an extended tunnel decorated with elaborate representations of the journey of the sun, incorporating the king, through the night sky and the mysteries of solar rebirth. Seti I was seceded by his son, the famous Ramses II The Great.

LOT 408 : 33"H x 29"W, Wall Hanging of Casting stone with fiberglass reinforcement

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 408

Coronation scene of

Egyptian Pricess Relief, Painted - Temple of Abidos, Egypt. 19th. Dynasty 1317 B.C. : Her name was Nes-Amun. She was one of the more than fifty daughters of Ramses II. Princesses were called Royal Daughters. They often had their own palaces or at least their own compound within the palace with an extensive staff of attendants. Sometimes the older daughter would marry their father after the death of their mother thus becoming the new Chief Queen. Often when a brother became king, he would marry the older sister probably following the tradition of the gods Osiris and Isis, who were brother and sister as well as husband and wife. A princess was often very involved in religious duties usually as priestesses of the goddess Hathor. In this wall fragment, Nes-Amun wears an elaborate wig and a white linen dress while presenting an offering to a deity.

LOT 409 : 39"H x 17"W , Wall Hanging of Casting stone with fiberglass reinforcement

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 409

Egyptian Pricess Rel

Anubis Relief, Painted - Temple of Abidos, Egypt. 19th.Dynasty 1317 B.C. : Anubis, God of the Dead, represented with a head of a jackal or simply as a jackal opened the road to the other world and presided over embalmments. After a funeral, Anubis would take the deceased by the hand and introduce him into the presence of the sovereign judges where the soul of the deceased would be weighed. Anubis was the Guardian of Offerings brought to the ceremony by heirs of the deceased and he also guarded the mummy from evil forces in the night. When the body was embalmed, a priest wearing a jackal mask acted as Anubis's representative. He also was the guardian of the Sacred Esoteric Mysteries. The origin of this God lay in the fact that jackals could be heard howling in the desert to the west of the Nile at sunset-at the time when burials took place. Here, Anubis is shown carrying the long ‘was’ scepter and the crook and flail, symbols of kingship.

LOT 411 : 38"H x 22"W , Wall Hanging of Casting stone with fiberglass reinforcement

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 411

Anubis Relief, Paint

Isis Relief, Painted - Temple of Kalabsha, Egypt. 300 B.C. : The name Isis means “seat” or “throne”. She was regarded as the symbolical mother of the King. In myth, she sought her dead husband and brother, Osiris, conceived her son Horus by him, buried and mourned him together with her sister Nephtys. Isis was regarded as the “Eye of Ra” and was worshipped as the “Great of Magic” who had protected her son Horus from snakes, predators and other dangers: thus she would protect mortal children also. The ancient Egyptians regarded the Goddess as the “Eye of Ra”. Here she carries the ankh and the papyrus sceptre of Goddesses; the horns and sun disk of Hathor and the hieroglyph for the name Isis on top of the sun-disk. She wears a feather dress and a headdress composed of a vulture, showing that she was identified with Mut.

LOT 310 : 23"H x 9"W, Wall Hanging

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 310

Isis Relief, Painted

Egyptian Pricess Relief - Temple of Abidos, Egypt. 19th. Dynasty 1317 B.C. : Her name was Nes-Amun. She was one of the more than fifty daughters of Ramses II. Princesses were called Royal Daughters. They often had their own palaces or at least their own compound within the palace with an extensive staff of attendants. Sometimes the older daughter would marry their father after the death of their mother thus becoming the new Chief Queen. Often when a brother became king, he would marry the older sister probably following the tradition of the gods Osiris and Isis, who were brother and sister as well as husband and wife. A princess was often very involved in religious duties usually as priestesses of the goddess Hathor. In this wall fragment, Nes-Amun wears an elaborate wig and a white linen dress while presenting an offering to a deity.

LOT 410 : 39"H x 17"W , Wall Hanging of Casting stone with fiberglass reinforcement

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 410

Egyptian Pricess Rel

Anubis Relief - Temple of Abidos, Egypt. 19th.Dynasty 1317 B.C. : Anubis, God of the Dead, represented with a head of a jackal or simply as a jackal opened the road to the other world and presided over embalmments. After a funeral, Anubis would take the deceased by the hand and introduce him into the presence of the sovereign judges where the soul of the deceased would be weighed. Anubis was the Guardian of Offerings brought to the ceremony by heirs of the deceased and he also guarded the mummy from evil forces in the night. When the body was embalmed, a priest wearing a jackal mask acted as Anubis's representative. He also was the guardian of the Sacred Esoteric Mysteries. The origin of this God lay in the fact that jackals could be heard howling in the desert to the west of the Nile at sunset-at the time when burials took place. Here, Anubis is shown carrying the long ‘was’ scepter and the crook and flail, symbols of kingship.

LOT 412 : 38"H x 22"W , Wall Hanging of Casting stone with fiberglass reinforcement

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 412

Anubis Relief - Temp

The offering of Maat, Painted - Temple of Abydos, Egypt - 1317B.C. : Here, Pharaoh Seti I, (father of Ramses II) is seen offering to the Gods the seated image of Maat, held in his hand like a doll. The Goddess Maat is the personification of all the elements of cosmic harmony as established by the Creator-God at the beginning of time-including truth, justice, law, world order and moral integrity. She is shown as a lady wearing on her head an ostrich feather. This scene establishes the king as the representative of divine order since Maat was seen legitimizing his authority to govern and to uphold the laws of the universe which she embodies.

LOT 413 : 38"H x 20.5"W , Wall Hanging of Casting stone with fiberglass reinforcement

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 413

The offering of Maat

The offering of Maat - Temple of Abydos, Egypt - 1317B.C. : Here, Pharaoh Seti I, (father of Ramses II) is seen offering to the Gods the seated image of Maat, held in his hand like a doll. The Goddess Maat is the personification of all the elements of cosmic harmony as established by the Creator-God at the beginning of time-including truth, justice, law, world order and moral integrity. She is shown as a lady wearing on her head an ostrich feather. This scene establishes the king as the representative of divine order since Maat was seen legitimizing his authority to govern and to uphold the laws of the universe which she embodies.

LOT 414 : 38"H x 20.5"W , Wall Hanging of Casting stone with fiberglass reinforcement

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 414

The offering of Maat

Egyptian Priest Relief, Painted - Temple of Abidos, Egypt. 19th. Dynasty 1317 B.C. : This relief depicts the young prince Seti I with his arm raised in the summoning position as part of a religious ritual. Here, he is serving in a priestly function as a innmutef priest symbolizing the divine child Horus with hair in a sidelock to represent youth and dressed with a leopard skin. As the eldest son of the royal family who cared for the deceased king he summons the revered spirit of the King, now identified with Osiris, and pronounces a formula before the image of his father Ramses I. A capable ruler, excellent field commander and energetic builder, Seti I embarked on a series of military campaigns in an effort to secure the boundaries of Egypt. Echoing the achievements of kings of the XVIII dynasty before Akhenaten, he inaugurated a major program to build and refurbish religious monuments at Thebes and Abydos. He took the additional title of “Repeater of births” to indicate that he regarded himself as the inaugurator of a new era. Seti I was seceded by his son, the famous Ramses II the Great.

LOT 415 : 31"H x 17"W, Wall Hanging of Casting stone with fiberglass reinforcement

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 415

Egyptian Priest Reli

Egyptian Priest Relief - Temple of Abidos, Egypt. 19th. Dynasty 1317 B.C. : This relief depicts the young prince Seti I with his arm raised in the summoning position as part of a religious ritual. Here, he is serving in a priestly function as a innmutef priest symbolizing the divine child Horus with hair in a sidelock to represent youth and dressed with a leopard skin. As the eldest son of the royal family who cared for the deceased king he summons the revered spirit of the King, now identified with Osiris, and pronounces a formula before the image of his father Ramses I. A capable ruler, excellent field commander and energetic builder, Seti I embarked on a series of military campaigns in an effort to secure the boundaries of Egypt. Echoing the achievements of kings of the XVIII dynasty before Akhenaten, he inaugurated a major program to build and refurbish religious monuments at Thebes and Abydos. He took the additional title of “Repeater of births” to indicate that he regarded himself as the inaugurator of a new era. Seti I was seceded by his son, the famous Ramses II the Great.

LOT 416 : 31"H x 17"W, Wall Hanging of Casting stone with fiberglass reinforcement

          NEW CATALOG: CLICK FOR PRICE & TO ORDER ITEM 416

Egyptian Priest Reli

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